Six new DC Comics Selfie Covers were released today! Find them all in our Guide to DC Selfie Covers! 

Aquaman #34
Batman ‘66 #14
Catwoman #34
Flash #34
Justice League Dark #34
Superman #34

The pillars of the DCU are re-imagined in the just added All Star Superman and All Star Batman and Robin: The Boy Wonder back issues!

All Star Superman
All Star Batman and Robin: The Boy Wonder

comicsforever

comicsforever:

Batman: 75 Years // by UnderTheWayneMansion (2014)

"Because he’s the hero Gotham deserves, but not the one it needs right now. So we’ll hunt him. Because he can take it. Because he’s not our hero. He’s a silent guardian. A watchful protector. A Dark Knight.”

comicsalliance
comicsalliance:

The 5 Best Modes of Transportation in Comics
It’s rare to see superheroes tooling around on a bus. Not only do schedules and GPS monitoring make it easy for supervillains to anticipate their attacks, but the constant jingle of change is a dead giveaway when they’re trying to sneak up on snitches. There are also very few pedestrian superheroes, despite what the critics say (cue rim shot). They all need some method of reliable transportation.
Some solutions that the creators came up with are funny but disastrous. Tim Drake’s Robin had The Redbird. It was a car that looked normal from the outside, but was scaled down to fit a child, so when an adult rode along, they were comically contorted to fit in the too-small seats. Then he had the Redboard. It was a skateboard painted red. Other times, creators cheat, having the characters swing on lines, presumably connected to building which are out of frame, or crash through doors just in time with no mention of how they got there.Other times, creators come up with solutions that make you ache for the world of comics, even with its high mortality and mutation rates. Here are comics’ five best methods of transportation.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

The 5 Best Modes of Transportation in Comics

It’s rare to see superheroes tooling around on a bus. Not only do schedules and GPS monitoring make it easy for supervillains to anticipate their attacks, but the constant jingle of change is a dead giveaway when they’re trying to sneak up on snitches. There are also very few pedestrian superheroes, despite what the critics say (cue rim shot). They all need some method of reliable transportation.

Some solutions that the creators came up with are funny but disastrous. Tim Drake’s Robin had The Redbird. It was a car that looked normal from the outside, but was scaled down to fit a child, so when an adult rode along, they were comically contorted to fit in the too-small seats. Then he had the Redboard. It was a skateboard painted red. Other times, creators cheat, having the characters swing on lines, presumably connected to building which are out of frame, or crash through doors just in time with no mention of how they got there.Other times, creators come up with solutions that make you ache for the world of comics, even with its high mortality and mutation rates. Here are comics’ five best methods of transportation.

READ MORE